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Archive for November, 2010 :


Researchers Revived Ancient Bacteria
November 30th, 2010

Binghamton University researchers recently revived ancient bacteria trapped for thousands of years in water droplets embedded in salt crystals. As if we are not already plagued with the current ones we have.


Wild Concept Car Grown From Seeds
November 30th, 2010

The best part is that Mercedes-Benz says the Biome can be grown from seeds, and not built in a traditional factory. It sounds crazy, but that’s part of the fun with any dream car.


Aging Reversed In Mice
November 29th, 2010

Scientists were surprised that they saw a dramatic reversal, not just a slowing down, of the aging in mice. Now they believe they might be able to regenerate human organs.


Study Backs Einstein Notion on Expanding Universe
November 28th, 2010

Scientists have found new evidence that an idea Albert Einstein regretted ever having may be key to solving a big mystery: why the universe is expanding at an ever-faster clip.


Poor Sleep Quality Increases Inflammation, Community Study Finds
November 28th, 2010

People who sleep poorly or do not get enough sleep have higher levels of inflammation, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, researchers have found.


DNA Sequence Variations Linked to Electrical Signal Conduction in the Heart
November 28th, 2010

Scientists studying genetic data from nearly 50,000 people have uncovered several DNA sequence variations associated with the electrical impulses that make the heart beat.


Synchronizing a Failing Heart: New Hope and Proven Help for Heart Failure Patients
November 28th, 2010

One of the largest, most extensive worldwide investigations into heart failure, led by the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI), conclusively proves that a new therapeutic implant synchronizes and strengthens a fading heart beat while reducing risk of death by 24% compared to the current treatment.


Early Phase of Atherosclerosis Imaged
November 28th, 2010

Atherosclerosis is characterized by hardening and thickening of artery walls, with serious health consequences. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have imaged the stages in the calcification process at a nanometer scale.


Vitamin D Deficit Doubles Risk of Stroke in Whites, but Not in Blacks, Study Finds
November 28th, 2010

Low levels of vitamin D, the essential nutrient obtained from milk, fortified cereals and exposure to sunlight, doubles the risk of stroke in whites, but not in blacks, according to a new report by researchers at Johns Hopkins.


Embryonic Stem Cell Culturing Grows from Art to Science
November 28th, 2010

Growing human embryonic stem cells in the lab is no small feat. Culturing the finicky, shape-shifting cells is labor intensive and, in some ways, more art than exact science.


Extensive Natural Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury Uncovered in Primate Study
November 28th, 2010

A study led by researchers in the Department of Neurosciences at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine shows unexpected and extensive natural recovery after spinal cord injury in primates.


Women With High Job Strain Have 40 Percent Increased Risk of Heart Disease, Study Finds
November 28th, 2010

Women who report having high job strain have a 40 percent increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart attacks and the need for procedures to open blocked arteries, compared to those with low job strain, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2010.


Cystic Fibrosis Gene Typo Is a Double Whammy
November 28th, 2010

An imbalance of salt and water in patients with cystic fibrosis makes their lungs clog up with sticky mucus that is prone to infection.


Death of Spouse, Child May Cause Higher Heart Rate, Other Dangers
November 28th, 2010

The death of a spouse or child can cause elevated heart rate and other potentially harmful heart rhythm changes among the recently bereaved, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2010.


Less Salt in Teenagers’ Diet May Improve Heart Health in Adulthood
November 28th, 2010

Eating smaller amounts of salt each day as a teenager could reduce high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke in adulthood, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2010.


Use of Mild Painkillers in Pregnancy Linked to Increased Risk of Male Reproductive Problems, New Evidence Shows
November 28th, 2010

New evidence has emerged that the use of mild painkillers such as paracetamol, aspirin and ibuprofen, may be part of the reason for the increase in male reproductive disorders in recent decades.


Wake Up, Mom: Gender Differences in Accepting Sleep Interruptions
November 28th, 2010

Working mothers are two-and-a-half times as likely as working fathers to interrupt their sleep to take care of others.


Phone-in Doctoring Fails to Improve Patient Outcomes
November 28th, 2010

Keeping in close contact with heart failure patients once they leave the hospital has been an ongoing challenge for physicians. A patient’s condition can worsen with no notice and early intervention could potentially make a big difference.


Brain Tissue Loss in People With Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment
November 28th, 2010

People with Alzheimer’s disease exhibit striking structural changes in the caudate nucleus, a brain structure typically associated with movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, a new study has found.


Program for Young Students Increases Interest in College Attendance and Medical Careers
November 28th, 2010

Two new studies have shown that a unique program in East Harlem that helps middle school students learn practical health skills and gain a better understanding of medical conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, resulted in increased interest in college attendance and medical careers among the students who attended the program.


Cerebral Malaria Linked to Epilepsy, Behavior Disorders
November 28th, 2010

Almost a third of cerebral malaria survivors developed epilepsy or other behavioral disorders in the most comprehensive study to date of the disease in African children, solidifying the link between malaria and neuropsychiatric disorders that affect hundreds of thousands of children.


Depression Linked to HIV Risk Among South African Young People, Study Shows
November 28th, 2010

University of Alberta research has discovered a strong link between depression and risky sexual behaviours such as improper condom use, transactional sex and relationship violence among young people in South Africa.


Minimally Invasive Procedure Safe Alternative for Treating Congenital Heart Defect, Study Suggests
November 28th, 2010

Transcatheter closure of secundum atrial septal defects (ASD), a common congenital heart abnormality in children, is a minimally invasive procedure that is a safe alternative to traditional surgery at long-term follow up.


Structure of a Protein Related to Heart and Nervous System Health Revealed
November 28th, 2010

University of Michigan researchers have solved the structure of a protein that is integral to processes responsible for maintaining a healthy heart and nervous system.


Combo High-Tech CT Scans Just as Good as Older Imaging to Detect Coronary Artery Disease
November 28th, 2010

Heart imaging specialists at Johns Hopkins have shown that a combination of CT scans that measure how much blood is flowing through the heart and the amount of plaque in surrounding arteries are just as good as tests that are less safe, more complex and more time-consuming to detect coronary artery disease and its severity.


Binge Drinking in Adolescence Changes Stress Response in Adulthood
November 28th, 2010

Alcohol exposure during adolescence alters the body’s ability to respond to stress in adulthood, according to new research in rats presented at Neuroscience 2010, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, held in San Diego.


Disadvantaged Youth More Likely to Be High-School Dropouts, Young Parents and Poor Adults
November 28th, 2010

Disadvantaged kids are more likely to drop out of high school, become premature parents and raise their own children in poverty, according to an exhaustive new study from researchers at Concordia University and the University of Ottawa.


29,000 Ontario Students Report Problem Gambling: Drug Use and Suicide a Concern
November 28th, 2010

A new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) has found that 29,000 Ontario students from grades 7-12 report behaviours indicating that they are gambling problematically.


Scientists Learn More About How Kidneys Fail and How New Drugs May Intervene
November 28th, 2010

Scientists are learning more about how protein gets in the urine when the kidneys begin to fail and how a new drug blocks it.


Not Following Doctor’s Orders: Prescription Abandonment
November 28th, 2010

Failure to have a prescription filled can undermine medical treatment, result in increased health care costs and potentially have devastating results for the patient. An editorial in the Nov. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine highlights the problem and issues a call to action.


Combining Two Types of Antidepressants Produces Stronger Effect; Mouse Study May Help Patients for Whom Existing Antidepressants Are Not Effective
November 28th, 2010

When it comes to antidepressants, two may be better than one. When drugs that alter two mood-regulating brain chemicals — serotonin and acetylcholine — are combined, they work together to produce a greater antidepressant response, a new animal study shows.


Nerve Cell Molecule Has Antidepressant Effect; Animal Study May Lead to More Effective Treatments for Depression
November 28th, 2010

Mice that lack a molecule involved in regulating nerve cell signaling are more active and resilient to stressful situations, a new study shows.


Pre-Injury Exercise May Mitigate the Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice
November 28th, 2010

Being physically fit before a traumatic brain injury (TBI) might improve recovery, preliminary findings suggest. After TBI, mice bred for running behavior exhibited smaller brain lesions and engaged in more extensive post-injury activity than did mice that had been sedentary before the injury.


Musicians Less Likely to Experience Age-Related Changes in the Auditory Cortex
November 28th, 2010

The old adage “use it or lose it” applies to hearing, suggests a new study. Older musicians do not experience certain changes in the auditory cortex — the part of the brain involved with hearing — that are associated with aging, according to research presented at Neuroscience 2010, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, held in San Diego.


New Method Helps Stroke Patients Recover Short Term Hand Control; Brain Stimulation and Practice Ease Paralysis of Wrist and Fingers
November 28th, 2010

People paralyzed by stroke temporarily regained the use of their hands after weeks of brain stimulation and physical therapy, according to new research.


Fat Outside of the Arteries May Be Linked to Future Cardiovascular Disease
November 28th, 2010

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) have found that fat around the outside of arteries may lead to the development of cardiovascular disease and could be linked to its onset in individuals with diabetes.


New Dry Powder Antibiotic Targets Tuberculosis, Reduces Treatment Time
November 28th, 2010

Scientists have developed an inhalable dry powder antibiotic that when used alone or with current treatments may significantly reduce treatment for tuberculosis (TB) and multi-drug resistant TB.


Increased Age of Sexual Consent in Canada May Not Protect Teens at Greatest Risk
November 28th, 2010

The increase in the legal age of sexual consent from 14 to 16 years in 2008 may not be protecting those at greatest risk, according to researchers who have analyzed British Columbia population-based data and recommend additional strategies to safeguard vulnerable children and teens.


New Low-Cost Method to Deliver Vaccine Shows Promise
November 28th, 2010

Researchers have developed a promising new approach to vaccination for rotavirus, a common cause of severe diarrheal disease that is responsible for approximately 500,000 deaths among children in the developing world every year.


Social Costs of Achievement Vary by Race/Ethnicity, School Features
November 28th, 2010

A new study finds that social ostracism of students who excel academically varies across racial/ethnic groups, and depends on characteristics of teens’ schools.


Stem Cell Patch May Result in Improved Function Following Heart Attack
November 28th, 2010

University of Cincinnati researchers have found that applying a stem cell-infused patch together with overexpression of a specific cell instruction molecule promoted cell migration to damaged cardiac tissue following heart attack and resulted in improved function in animal models.


Disease Tracking: Is There an App for That?
November 28th, 2010

British scientists are hoping to use the location, or ‘geo’, information that is increasingly a part of mobile internet and phone usage, to track the spread of infectious diseases and so provide important clues about how quickly a pandemic might occur and also provide data with which epidemiologists can work.


New Search Engine Links Biomedical Articles to Nucleic Acid Sequences
November 28th, 2010

Researchers from the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid’s Biomedical Informatics Group based at the Facultad de Informática have created a tool called PubDNA Finder. This tool is the first search engine specialized in linking biomedical articles to nucleic acid sequences.


Oxytocin Medication Often Unnecessary in Normal Deliveries, Swedish Research Finds
November 28th, 2010

It is standard practice in Swedish delivery rooms to use oxytocin to stimulate a labour that has been slow to start or has grind to a halt for a few hours. However, it is also fine to wait for a further three hours in first-time mothers, reveals a thesis from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.


Video Game-Based Therapy Helps Stroke Patients Recover Study
November 28th, 2010

Repeated exercise, even in a virtual environment, helped stroke patients improve arm and hand function, according to a new human study of an interactive video game-based therapy.


New Blood Test May Help Predict Heart Failure in Apparently Healthy Older Adults
November 28th, 2010

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore report that a new, highly sensitive investigative blood test may help predict the risk of heart failure and cardiovascular death much earlier than previously possible in older people who do not have symptoms of heart failure.


Regular Exercise Reduces Large Number of Health Risks Including Dementia and Some Cancers, Study Finds
November 28th, 2010

Regular exercise can reduce around two dozen physical and mental health conditions and slow down how quickly the body ages, according to a research review summarising the key findings of 40 papers published between 2006 and 2010.


Tests Show Bright Future for Gadonanotubes in Stem Cell Tracking
November 28th, 2010

Gadonanotubes (GNTs) developed at Rice University are beginning to show positive results in a study funded by a federal stimulus grant through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) last year.


Smoking Among Some Adults Dropped Dramatically in Past Three Decades
November 28th, 2010

The proportion of adult smokers dramatically decreased during the past three decades in at least one metropolitan area — with more quitting and fewer picking up the habit, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2010.


Adapted MRI Scan Improves Picture of Changes to the Brain
November 28th, 2010

Standard MRI scans have so far been unable to produce satisfactory images of nerve bundles. However, this is now possible using an MRI technique called Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI).


Risk Factors That Lead to Bicycling Injuries in City Traffic
November 28th, 2010

The streets of New York City can be dangerous for bicyclists, but they can be especially risky for young adult male bicyclists who don’t wear helmets, have too much to drink, or are listening to music through earphones, a group of investigators from New York City’s Bellevue Hospital reported at the 2010 Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons.


Broad New Technique for Screening Proteins Devised
November 28th, 2010

A team led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has developed a powerful new method for detecting functional sites on proteins. The technique may have broad applications in basic research and drug development.


Stunning Details of Brain Connections Revealed
November 28th, 2010

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, applying a state-of-the-art imaging system to brain-tissue samples from mice, have been able to quickly and accurately locate and count the myriad connections between nerve cells in unprecedented detail, as well as to capture and catalog those connections’ surprising variety.


How Anthrax Bacteria Impair Immune Response
November 28th, 2010

Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, have determined a key mechanism by which Bacillus anthracis bacteria initiate anthrax infection despite being greatly outnumbered by immune system scavenger cells.


Heart Disease in Children Harms Mothers’ Mental Health
November 28th, 2010

Mothers of children with severe heart disease are more likely to suffer from anxiety and depression than mothers of healthy children, even once any medical interventions are over.


Fat Measure BMI Underestimates Body Fat in UK South Asian Children
November 28th, 2010

South Asian children living in the UK have higher average levels of body fat than white European and black African Caribbean children in the UK.


Why the Road to Health Is Paved With, Often Unrealised, Good Intentions
November 28th, 2010

We regularly hear how the best of intentions do not translate into action. This is nowhere more apparent than in the case of healthy eating, where many fall through the gap between intention and action.


Brain Cells Called Pericytes Become a Player in Alzheimer’s, Other Diseases
November 28th, 2010

Cells in the brain called pericytes that have not been high on the list of targets for treating diseases like Alzheimer’s may play a more crucial role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases than has been realized.


Doubled Risk of Anxiety for 18 Month-Old Children With Congenital Heart Defects
November 28th, 2010

Research from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH) shows that children with severe congenital heart defects have twice the risk of anxiety at 18 months of age compared to healthy children.


Health Literacy Impacts Chance of Heart Failure Hospitalization, Study Says
November 28th, 2010

Being able to read and understand words like anemia, hormones and seizure means a patient with heart failure may be less likely to be hospitalized, according to a new study from Emory University School of Medicine. Findings will be presented Nov. 17 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions conference in Chicago.


Nurse Practitioner-Led Spinal Clinic Produced Impressive Results and Shorter Waiting Times in New Study
November 28th, 2010

Ninety-six per cent of patients with back problems were satisfied with the assessment carried out by a specially trained nurse practitioner, according to a study in the December issue of the Journal of Advanced Nursing.


Multidisciplinary Approach Is Key to Successful Treatment of Aggressive Prostate Cancer
November 28th, 2010

A research team from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) designated Kimmel Cancer Center (KCC) at Jefferson has concluded that a multidisciplinary clinic approach to aggressive prostate cancer can improve survival in patients.


Small Clumps of Tau Protein Disrupt Memory; Animal Study Suggests Possible Target for Alzheimer’s Disease Therapies
November 28th, 2010

Too many small aggregates of a protein called tau in the brain can directly interfere with memory, according to new animal research presented at Neuroscience 2010, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, held in San Diego.


Energy Drink Consumption Is Strongly Linked With Risks of Heavy Drinking and Alcohol Dependence
November 28th, 2010

Many adolescents and college students innocently ingest large amounts of energy drinks to stay awake. But, new research shows that energy drink over-use is strongly linked with increased risks of engaging in episodes of heavy drinking and developing alcohol dependence.


Preterm Birth Rates Improve in Most US States, Report Finds
November 28th, 2010

Eight states earned a better grade on the 2010 March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card and 32 others and the District of Columbia saw their preterm birth rates improve.


New Needle-Free HPV Vaccine Increases Effectiveness, Availability in Developing World, Research Finds
November 28th, 2010

New research being presented at the 2010 FIP Pharmaceutical Sciences World Congress in association with the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists Annual Meeting and Exposition will highlight a targeted inhalable dry powder vaccine that may prove preferable in terms of needle avoidance and expected lower cost than the current commercial human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine used throughout the world.


Enzyme Action Could Be Target for Diabetes, Heart Disease Treatments
November 28th, 2010

Cardiac researchers at UC have found a new cellular pathway that could help in developing therapeutic treatments for obesity-related disorders, like diabetes and heart disease.


Infant Estrogen Levels Tracked Through Diaper Research
November 28th, 2010

With the help of babies and more than 5,000 of their diapers, Emory University researchers have developed an accurate, noninvasive method to determine estrogen levels in infants.


Heart Surgeries Can Trigger Strokes, Seizures and Other Neurological Complications
November 28th, 2010

Strokes, seizures and other neurological complications related to heart surgery account for “considerable morbidity and mortality,” Loyola University Health System neurologists report in the November issue of the journal Hospital Practice.


Smoke from Fireworks Is Harmful to Health, Study Suggests
November 28th, 2010

The metallic particles in the smoke emitted by fireworks pose a health risk, particularly to people who suffer from asthma. This is the conclusion of a study led by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC).


Protein With Cardioprotective Capabilities During Heart Attack Discovered
November 28th, 2010

University of Cincinnati researchers have discovered a new protein that could be cardioprotective during heart attack, potentially leading to more targeted treatments for patients at risk.


New 3-D Model of RNA ‘Core Domain’ of Enzyme Telomerase May Offer Clues to Cancer, Aging
November 28th, 2010

Telomerase is an enzyme that maintains the DNA at the ends of our chromosomes, known as telomeres. In the absence of telomerase activity, every time our cells divide, our telomeres get shorter.


Online Map of Maternal Health to Inform and Influence World Leaders
November 28th, 2010

Researchers from the University of Southampton have helped construct an online interactive world map which gives stark facts and figures about the health of women during pregnancy, childbirth and following the birth of their child.


Global Economic Woes Make Universal Access to AIDS Drugs Unlikely, Analysis Shows
November 28th, 2010

Universal access to lifesaving AIDS drugs — a United Nations’ Millennium Development Goal that officials hoped to accomplish by 2010 — would require a staggering $15 billion annual investment from the international community at a time when the economic downturn is challenging continued funding for relief efforts, according to a new analysis by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.


Researchers Identify PTSD Measures for Use in Traumatic Brain Injury Research
November 28th, 2010

Five U.S. federal agencies recently cosponsored a set of expert work groups to formulate common data elements for research related to psychological adjustment and traumatic brain injury (TBI).


Culturally Sensitive Treatment Model Helps Bring Depressed Chinese Immigrants Into Treatment
November 28th, 2010

A treatment model designed to accommodate the beliefs and concerns of Chinese immigrants appears to significantly improve the recognition and treatment of major depression in this typically underserved group.


Gene Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma in Mice Produces Complete Remission
November 28th, 2010

A potent anti-tumor gene introduced into mice with metastatic melanoma has resulted in permanent immune reconfiguration and produced a complete remission of their cancer, according to an article to be published in the December 2010 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.


Economic Downturn Takes Toll on Health of Americans With Heart Disease, Diabetes or Cancer
November 28th, 2010

A new poll from researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Knowledge Networks (KN) shows that many people with heart disease, diabetes or cancer believe the economic downturn is hurting their health and will have further negative impacts in the future.


Scientists Ferret out a Key Pathway for Aging
November 28th, 2010

For decades, scientists have been searching for the fundamental biological secrets of how eating less extends lifespan.


Organ Procurement: Air Transportation Displays Poor Safety Record
November 28th, 2010

The transplant community was largely unaware of sub-standard transportation practices for donor organs until a number of fatal air crashes took the lives of transplant personnel, calling attention to procurement aviation safety.


Hearing Loss Study Reveals Role of Bone Hardness in Tissue Function
November 28th, 2010

Scientists are reporting the first direct evidence that a subtle change in the physical properties of a tissue can affect its function.


Does Sex Matter? It May When Evaluating Mental Status
November 28th, 2010

Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that differs between the sexes in terms of age at onset, symptomatology, response to medication, and structural brain abnormalities.


US Adults Most Likely to Forgo Care Due to Cost, Have Trouble Paying Medical Bills, Survey Finds
November 28th, 2010

A new 11-country survey from The Commonwealth Fund finds that adults in the United States are far more likely than those in 10 other industrialized nations to go without health care because of costs, have trouble paying medical bills, encounter high medical bills even when insured, and have disputes with their insurers or discover insurance wouldn’t pay as they expected.


Mysterious Cells May Play Role in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
November 28th, 2010

By tracking the fate of a group of immature cells that persist in the adult brain and spinal cord, Johns Hopkins researchers discovered in mice that these cells undergo dramatic changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.


Vitamin C May Offer Potential Life-Saving Treatment for Sepsis
November 28th, 2010

Physicians caring for patients with sepsis may soon have a new safe and cost-effective treatment for this life-threatening illness.


Influenza Vaccines of the Future
November 28th, 2010

In a review article appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, examine research under way to address the limitations of currently available influenza vaccines and develop more efficient and reliable strategies to make vaccines to protect against seasonal as well as pandemic influenza.


Structure of Lassa Virus Protein Reveals Viral Thievery
November 28th, 2010

Scientists at Emory University and the University of St. Andrews have solved the structure of a key protein from Lassa virus, which is endemic to West Africa and can cause a deadly hemorrhagic fever.


Mortal Chemical Combat Typifies the World of Bacteria
November 28th, 2010

Like all organisms, bacteria must compete for resources to survive, even if it means a fight to the death.


Hope for Treatment of Cocaine Addiction: Block Memories
November 28th, 2010

Two separate discoveries by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) offer potential for development of a first-ever pharmacological treatment for cocaine addiction.


Scientists Identify Antivirus System in Host Cells
November 28th, 2010

Viruses have led scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis to the discovery of a security system in host cells.


Differences in Brain Development Between Males and Females May Hold Clues to Mental Health Disorders
November 28th, 2010

Many mental health disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia, produce changes in social behavior or interactions.


Fighting America’s ‘Other Drug Problem’: Researchers Find Key to Combating Medication Non-Adherence
November 28th, 2010

Medications do not have a chance to fight health problems if they are taken improperly or not taken at all. Non-adherence to medications costs thousands of lives and billions of dollars each year in the United States alone, according to the New England Healthcare Institute.


Machine Learning Technique Designed to Improve Consumer Medical Searches
November 28th, 2010

Medical websites like WebMD provide consumers with more access than ever before to health and medical information, but the sites’ utility becomes limited if users use unclear or unorthodox language to describe conditions in a site search.


Depression-Like Behavior Identified in Zebrafish; Inability to Cope With Stress May Play Role in Depression
November 28th, 2010

Disrupting the stress response in zebrafish generates behaviors that resemble depression, according to new research presented at Neuroscience 2010, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, held in San Diego.


Disruptive Behaviour Disorders in Male Teenagers Associated With Increased Risk of Road Crashes
November 28th, 2010

Disruptive behaviour disorders in male teenagers, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, and oppositional defiant disorder are associated with about a one-third increase in the risk of being seriously injured in a road traffic crash — either as driver or pedestrian.


Pre-Eclampsia: Early Urine Test Predicts Pregnancy Complication
November 28th, 2010

Pre-eclampsia affects approximately 5% of pregnancies and can pose serious health concerns for mother and child. Some patients develop severe disease associated with kidney, liver, and neurological problems.


Elderly Can Blame Fractures and Falls on Low Sodium
November 28th, 2010

Older adults with even mildly decreased levels of sodium in the blood (hyponatremia) experience increased rates of fractures and falls, according to a study presented at the American Society of Nephrology’s 43rd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition. Falls are a serious health problem for the elderly and account for about 50 percent of deaths due to injury in the elderly.


Earlier Specialist Care Associated With Lower Incidence of ESRD and Better Patient Outcomes
November 28th, 2010

Among kidney disease patients, earlier care from a nephrologist is associated with a decreased likelihood of developing end-stage renal disease and a lower risk of death during the first year of dialysis, according to a study presented at the American Society of Nephrology’s 43rd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition.


Physicists Study Behavior of Enzyme Linked to Alzheimer’s, Cancer
November 28th, 2010

University of Houston (UH) physicists are using complex computer simulations to illuminate the workings of a crucial protein that, when malfunctioning, may cause Alzheimer’s and cancer.


First Synthetic Activator of Two Critical Proteins Identified: New Approach to Treat Numerous Metabolic Disorders?
November 28th, 2010

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a novel synthetic activator of a pair of proteins that belong to a protein family playing key roles in human metabolism and immune function.


Finger-Trap Tension Stabilizes Cells’ Chromosome-Separating Machinery
November 28th, 2010

Scientists have discovered an amazingly simple way that cells stabilize their machinery for forcing apart chromosomes.


Childhood Obesity Linked to Increased Risk of Adult Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders
November 28th, 2010

Mounting evidence linking childhood obesity to an increasing risk of obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and other cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in adulthood is clearly presented in a comprehensive review article in the current issue of Childhood Obesity, published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Pomegranate Juice Reduces Damage to Tissues, Inflammation and Infections, Study Suggests
November 28th, 2010

Studies in recent years have claimed multiple health benefits of pomegranate juice, including that it is a good source of antioxidants and lowers both cholesterol and blood pressure, especially in diabetic and hypertensive patients.


E. Coli Infection Linked to Long-Term Health Problems
November 28th, 2010

People who contract gastroenteritis from drinking water contaminated with E. coli are at an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, kidney problems and heart disease in later life, finds a study published on the British Medical Journal website.


Care for Prisoners Will Improve Public Health, Researchers Say
November 28th, 2010

In a comprehensive global survey, researchers in Texas and England have concluded that improving the mental and physical health of inmates will improve public health.


Importance of Exercise for Those at Special Risk for Alzheimer’s
November 28th, 2010

In a study that included healthy 65- to 85-years-old who carried a high-risk gene for Alzheimer’s disease, those who exercised showed greater brain activity in memory-related regions than those who were sedentary.


Key Enzyme That Regulates the Early Growth of Breast Cancer Cells Identified
November 28th, 2010

New University of Georgia research, published this week in the early online edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, has found that blocking the action of an enzyme called GnT-V significantly delays the onset and spread of tumors in mice with cancer very similar to many cases of human breast cancer.


Taking a Break from Osteoporosis Drugs Can Protect Bones, Study Finds
November 28th, 2010

Taking time off from certain osteoporosis drugs may be beneficial to bone health, according to a study conducted at Loyola University Health System.


Well-Known Molecule May Be Behind Alcohol’s Benefits to Heart Health
November 28th, 2010

Many studies support the assertion that moderate drinking is beneficial when it comes to cardiovascular health, and for the first time scientists have discovered that a well-known molecule, called Notch, may be behind alcohol’s protective effects.


First Successful Salivary Stone Removal With Robotics
November 28th, 2010

Dr. Rohan Walvekar, Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Director of Clinical Research and the Salivary Endoscopy Service at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, has reported the first use of a surgical robot guided by a miniature salivary endoscope to remove a 20mm salivary stone and repair the salivary duct of a 31-year-old patient. Giant stones have traditionally required complete removal of the salivary gland.


Modulating a Protein in the Brain Could Help Control Alzheimer’s Disease
November 28th, 2010

A protein known to exist in the brain for more than 30 years, called 5-lipoxygenase, has been found to play a regulatory role in the formation of the amyloid beta in the brain, the major component of plaques implicated in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, according to researchers at Temple University’s School of Medicine.


Hormone Therapy Use May Increase or Decrease Dementia Risk Depending Upon Timing
November 28th, 2010

Compared to women never on hormone therapy, those taking hormone therapy only at midlife had a 26 percent decreased risk of dementia; while women taking HT only in late life had a 48 percent increased risk of dementia, according to Kaiser Permanente researchers.


Exhaustion Syndrome Leaves Measurable Changes in the Brain
November 28th, 2010

Exhaustion syndrome, also called burnout and exhaustion depression, leaves objectively measurable changes in the brain — including reduced activity in the frontal lobes and altered regulation of the stress hormone cortisol. This is shown in a new dissertation from Umeå University in Sweden.


Scientists Discover How Estrogen Works and Flip Its Switch to Reap Benefits Without Risks
November 28th, 2010

Estrogen is an elixir for the brain, sharpening mental performance in humans and animals and showing promise as a treatment for disorders of the brain such as Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia.


Potential Genetic Target for Heart Disease Discovered
November 28th, 2010

Researchers at UC have found a potential genetic target for heart disease, which could lead to therapies to prevent the development of the nation’s No. 1 killer in its initial stages.


Chemicals’ Study Pinpoints Threat to Workers’ Lungs
November 28th, 2010

Tiny particles used in a range of everyday products from computers to shampoo can adversely affect the lungs in very different ways, a study has shown.


Daily Hemodialysis Helps Protect Kidney Patients’ Hearts
November 28th, 2010

Frequent hemodialysis improved left ventricular mass (heart size) and self-reported physical health compared to conventional hemodialysis for kidney failure, according to the Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) Daily Trial funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.


Gene Linked to Worsening Kidney Disease in African-Americans
November 28th, 2010

In African Americans with kidney disease related to hypertension (high blood pressure), a common gene variant is associated with a sharply increased risk of progressive kidney disease, according to a study presented at the American Society of Nephrology’s 43rd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition.


Graphic Images Influence Intentions to Quit Smoking
November 28th, 2010

Marketing researchers at the University of Arkansas, Villanova University and Marquette University surveyed more than 500 U.S. and Canadian smokers and found that the highly graphic images of the negative consequences of smoking have the greatest impact on smokers’ intentions to quit.


Designing More Effective Anti-HIV Antibodies
November 28th, 2010

Although people infected with HIV produce many antibodies against the protein encapsulating the virus, most of these antibodies are strangely ineffective at fighting the disease.


Cholesterol-Lowering Statins Boost Bacteria-Killing Cells
November 28th, 2010

Widely prescribed for their cholesterol-lowering properties, recent clinical research indicates that statins can produce a second, significant health benefit: lowering the risk of severe bacterial infections such as pneumonia and sepsis.


Painless Needles? Self-Adminstered Skin Patches for Vaccines Under Development
November 28th, 2010

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded $10 million to the Georgia Institute of Technology, Emory University and PATH, a Seattle-based nonprofit organization, to advance a technology for the painless, self-administration of flu vaccine using patches containing tiny microneedles that dissolve into the skin.


Molecular Structure of Dopamine Receptor Discovered
November 28th, 2010

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has solved the structure of one of the receptors that responds to the neurotransmitter dopamine.


Genetics Determine Winter Vitamin D Status
November 28th, 2010

Vitamin D is somewhat of an unusual “vitamin,” because it can be made in the body from sunlight and most foods do not contain vitamin D unless added by fortification. Synthesis of vitamin D in the body requires exposure to ultraviolet light and can be influenced by genetics, skin color, and sun exposure.


Rare Mutations Linked With Catastrophic Aortic Aneurysms
November 28th, 2010

Discovery of a fifth gene defect and the identification of 47 DNA regions linked to thoracic aortic disease are the subject of studies released this month involving researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).


Identification Codes Inserted Into Mouse Embryos
November 28th, 2010

Researchers from the Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), in collaboration with researchers from the Institute of Microelectronics of Barcelona (IMB-CNM) of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), have developed an identification system for oocytes and embryos in which each can be individually tagged using silicone barcodes.


Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Linked to Death, Atherosclerosis in Veterans, Research Finds
November 28th, 2010

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) more than doubles a veteran’s risk of death from any cause and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2010.


Discovery in How HIV Thwarts the Body’s Natural Defense Opens Up New Target for Drug Therapies
November 28th, 2010

Natural killer cells are major weapons in the body’s immune system. They keep the body healthy by knocking off tumors and cells infected with viruses, bombarding them with tiny lethal pellets. But natural killer cells are powerless against HIV, a fact that has bedeviled science for over 20 years.


Personalized Multimedia Program May Help Prevent Falls in Patients Without Cognitive Impairment
November 28th, 2010

A patient education program combining videos with one-on-one follow-up did not appear to reduce the risk of falls among all older hospital patients, but was associated with fewer falls among patients who were not cognitively impaired, according to a report posted online November 22 that will be published in the March 28 print issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.


Lower-Income Families With High-Deductible Health Plans May Put Off Care Because of Costs
November 28th, 2010

Lower-income families in high-deductible health plans appear more likely to delay or forgo medical care based on cost than higher-income families with similar coverage, according to a report in the November 22 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.


Black Children More Likely to Die from Neuroblastoma, Study Finds
November 28th, 2010

Black, Asian, and Native American children are more likely than white and Hispanic children to die after being treated for neuroblastoma, according to new research on the pediatric cancer.


Aggressive Surgery Is Best for Children With Brain Tumors, Study Suggests
November 28th, 2010

A new Mayo Clinic study found that children with low-grade brain tumors (gliomas) who undergo aggressive surgery to completely remove the tumor have an increased chance of overall survival.


Hong Kong Hospital Reports Possible Airborne Influenza Transmission
November 28th, 2010

Direct contact and droplets are the primary ways influenza spreads. Under certain conditions, however, aerosol transmission is possible.


Putting the Squeeze on Fat Cells
November 28th, 2010

From fad diets to exercise programs, Americans continue to fight the battle of the bulge. Now they’ll have help from recent Tel Aviv University research that has developed a new method to look at how fat cells — which produce the fat in our bodies — respond to mechanical loads.


Protein Found to Predict Brain Injury in Children on Extra-Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) Life Support
November 28th, 2010

Johns Hopkins Children’s Center scientists have discovered that high blood levels of a protein commonly found in the central nervous system can predict brain injury and death in critically ill children on a form of life support called extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation or ECMO.


More Than Half of Depression Patients Give Up Their Treatment
November 28th, 2010

Most patients who take anti-depressants give up their treatment in less than six months, the minimum period recommended for treating severe depression and other derived pathologies.


Medical Imaging Breakthrough Uses Light and Sound to See Microscopic Details Inside Our Bodies
November 28th, 2010

See it for yourself: a new breakthrough in imaging technology using a combination of light and sound will allow health care providers to see microscopic details inside the body.


New Spinal Implant to Help People With Paraplegia Exercise Paralyzed Limbs
November 28th, 2010

Engineers have developed a new type of microchip muscle stimulator implant that will enable people with paraplegia to exercise their paralysed leg muscles.


Sleep Program Needed for IT Engineers
November 28th, 2010

Insomnia is bad news for software engineers’ quality of life and deserves greater recognition and attention, according to new research by Sara Sarrafi Zadeh and Khyrunnisa Begum from the University of Mysore in India.


Kids With Larger Waist Sizes Are More Likely to Have Cardiac Risk FactorsKids With Larger Waist Sizes Are More Likely to Have Cardiac Risk Factors
November 28th, 2010

In a study of more than 4,500 children, researchers found those with higher waist circumferences had significantly higher pulse pressures, which is known to be linked to increased risk of heart-related disorders.


Normal Cells Transformed Into 3-D Cancers in Tissue Culture Dishes
November 28th, 2010

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have successfully transformed normal human tissue into three-dimensional cancers in a tissue culture dish for the first time.


Rare Disease Reveals New Path for Creating Stem Cells
November 28th, 2010

As debilitating as disease can be, sometimes it acts as a teacher. Researchers at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Dental Medicine have found that by mimicking a rare genetic disorder in a dish, they can rewind the internal clock of a mature cell and drive it back into an adult stem-cell stage.


Protein in the Urine: A Warning Sign for Cognitive Decline
November 28th, 2010

Two new studies show a link between protein in the urine on cognitive decline: “Small Amounts of Urinary Protein Predict More Rapid Cognitive Decline in Elderly Women” and “Urinary Protein Excretion Increases Risk of Cognitive Impairment.”


Parental Divorce in Childhood Linked to Stroke in Adulthood
November 28th, 2010

Children who experience a parental divorce are over twice as likely to suffer a stroke at some point in their lives, according to new research presented in New Orleans at The Gerontological Society of America’s (GSA) 63rd Annual Scientific Meeting.


Genes Link Puberty Timing to Body Fat in Women
November 28th, 2010

Scientists have discovered 30 new genes that control the age of sexual maturation in women. Notably, many of these genes also act on body weight regulation or biological pathways related to fat metabolism.


New Path for Colon Cancer Drug Discovery
November 28th, 2010

An old pinworm medicine is a new lead in the search for compounds that block a signaling pathway implicated in colon cancer.


Rett Syndrome Mobilizes Jumping Genes in the Brain
November 28th, 2010

With few exceptions, jumping genes-restless bits of DNA that can move freely about the genome-are forced to stay put. In patients with Rett syndrome, however, a mutation in the MeCP2 gene mobilizes so-called L1 retrotransposons in brain cells, reshuffling their genomes and possibly contributing to the symptoms of the disease when they find their way into active genes, report researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.


Why Are We Getting Fatter? Seeking a Mysterious Culprit
November 28th, 2010

So, why are we fat? And getting fatter? Most people would say it’s simple: We eat too much and exercise too little.


Fecal Immunochemical Testing Best and Most Cost-Effective Method for Screening for Colorectal Cancer
November 28th, 2010

Annual screening by fecal immunochemical testing — a test that detects blood in the stool, has high sensitivity and specificity, and might improve participation rates through increased patient acceptability — reduces the risk of colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer related deaths, and reduces healthcare costs in comparison to all other screening strategies and to no screening.


Alcohol Consumption Decreases With the Development of Disease
November 28th, 2010

In a cross-sectional study from the 2004 and 2007 Australian National Drug Strategy Household (NDSH) surveys, respondents were questioned about their current and past drinking, the presence of formal diagnosis for specific diseases (heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cancer, anxiety, depression) and self-perceived general health status.


Effects of Pregnancy on Oral Health
November 27th, 2010

Even though most people are aware that good oral health is essential for the overall health of both mother and child, misunderstandings about the safety of dental care during pregnancy may cause pregnant women to avoid seeing their dentist.


Discovery Halts Breast Cancer Stem Cells
November 27th, 2010

Breast cancer stem cells (CSCs), the aggressive cells thought to be resistant to current anti-cancer therapies and which promote metastasis, are stimulated by estrogen via a pathway that mirrors normal stem cell development.


Use of HIV Medications Reduces Risk of HIV Infection in Uninfected People, Study Suggests
November 27th, 2010

In a finding with the potential to fundamentally change strategies to slow the global HIV epidemic, a new study called iPrEx shows that individuals at high risk for HIV infection who took a single daily tablet containing two widely used HIV medications, emtricitabine and tenofovir (FTC/TDF), experienced an average of 43.8% fewer HIV infections than those who received a placebo pill (95% CI 15.4 to 62.6%; P=0.005).


Dietitians Play Essential Role in Effective Management of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes in Adults
November 27th, 2010

Proper nutrition therapy is essential for the successful management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and registered dietitians (RDs) can play a key role as part of the health care team.


Antiretroviral Drugs Can Prevent HIV in Men Who Have Sex With Men, Study Shows
November 27th, 2010

In a significant advance for HIV prevention research, a clinical trial confirms that the same drugs used for treating HIV can also help prevent HIV infection in the first place.


Cigarette Smoking Increases Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk in African Americans
November 27th, 2010

A new study determined that African Americans who smoke cigarettes have a higher risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA).


HIV Drugs Interfere With Blood Sugar, Lead to Insulin Resistance
November 27th, 2010

The same powerful drugs that have extended the lives of countless people with HIV come with a price — insulin resistance that can lead to diabetes and cardiovascular disease.


Heart Health: Implanted Devices as Effective in ‘Real World’ as in Clinical Trial Settings
November 27th, 2010

Implanted devices that treat cardiac dysfunction in heart failure patients are as successful in “real world” use as they are in controlled clinical trial settings, according to a large new study reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.


High Alpha-Carotene Levels Associated With Longer Life
November 27th, 2010

High blood levels of the antioxidant alpha-carotene appear to be associated with a reduced risk of dying over a 14-year period, according to a report posted online November 22 that will be published in the March 28 print issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.


Divide and Conquer Strategy for Childhood Brain Cancer
November 27th, 2010

Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant brain tumors of childhood, with 40 to 50 percent overall mortality.


Excess Fructose May Play Role in Diabetes, Obesity and Other Health Conditions
November 27th, 2010

More and more people have become aware of the dangers of excessive fructose in diet.


Nearly 25 Percent of Overweight Women Misperceive Body Weight
November 27th, 2010

A startling number of overweight and normal weight women of reproductive age inaccurately perceive their body weight, affecting their weight-related behaviors and making many vulnerable to cardiovascular and other obesity-related diseases, according to new research from the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston.


Overweight Primarily a Problem Among Wealthier Women in Low To Middle-Income Countries
November 27th, 2010

A new study from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) finds that high body mass index (BMI) in developing countries remains primarily a problem of the rich.


New Function of Gene in Promoting Cancer Found
November 27th, 2010

Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University have discovered that a gene well known for its involvement in tumor cell development, growth and metastasis also protects cancer cells from being destroyed by chemotherapy.


Stability Is First Step Toward Treating ALS
November 27th, 2010

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that eventually destroys most motor neurons, causing muscle weakness and atrophy throughout the body.


New Sleep Cycle Discovery Explains Why Fatty Diets During Pregnancy Make Kids Obese
November 27th, 2010

The link between sleeping and obesity is drawn tighter as a new research published online in the FASEB Journal study shows that what your mother ate when she was pregnant may make you obese or overweight by altering the function of genes (epigenetic changes) that regulate circadian rhythm.


Eyeblink Conditioning May Help in Assessing Children With Fetal Alcohol Exposure
November 27th, 2010

Children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) are extremely difficult to diagnose, as well as treat. But new research indicates that eyeblink conditioning may provide a better model for assessing and diagnosing FAS in children.


Aerobic Exercise May Reduce Excessive Cocaine Use
November 27th, 2010

Aerobic exercise may protect against binge-like patterns of cocaine use, suggests a new study. Rats allowed access to running wheels self-administered less cocaine than did rats that were not.


No Reduction in Adverse Medical Events Over Six Years Despite Efforts
November 27th, 2010

Despite concerted efforts, no decreases in patient harm were detected at 10 randomly selected North Carolina hospitals between 2002 and 2007, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement.


A Decade of Refinements in Transplantation Improves Long-Term Survival of Blood Cancers
November 27th, 2010

A decade of refinements in marrow and stem cell transplantation to treat blood cancers significantly reduced the risk of treatment-related complications and death.


Early Intervention Essential to Success for at-Risk Children, Study Finds
November 27th, 2010

Children living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods are more likely to succeed if they participate in a community-based prevention program, according to findings released recently from a multi-year research study based at Queen’s University.


Retirement Reduces Tiredness and Depression, Study Finds
November 27th, 2010

Retirement leads to a substantial reduction in mental and physical fatigue and depressive symptoms, finds a study published on the British Medical Journal website.


Binge Drinking May Lead to Higher Risk of Heart Disease
November 27th, 2010

Belfast’s binge drinking culture could be behind the country’s high rates of heart disease, according to a paper published on the British Medical Journal website.


Less Invasive Method for Determining Stage of Lung Cancer Shows Benefits
November 27th, 2010

A comparison of two strategies to determine the stage of suspected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) finds that the less invasive method is more effective at identifying a type of lung cancer that has spread, and may result in a reduction of unnecessary surgical procedures and associated adverse effects for certain patients, according to a study in the November 24 issue of JAMA.


Plant-Derived Scavengers Prowl the Body for Nerve Toxins
November 27th, 2010

The brain is forever chattering to itself, via electrical impulses sent along its hard-wired neuronal “Ethernet.”


Hormone’s Crucial Role in Two Anemic Blood Disorders
November 27th, 2010

A hormone made by the body may be a potential therapeutic tool for the treatment of two anemic blood disorders — beta-thalassemia and hemochromatosis.


For Your Teeth, Thanksgiving Dinner Is a Real Food Fight
November 27th, 2010

If you’re lucky, it will all be kisses and hugs around the Thanksgiving dinner table, with friends and family near and dear gathered about, and puppies at your feet waiting for table scraps.


Dealt a Bad Hand: Pathological Gamblers Are Also at Risk for Mental Health Disorders
November 27th, 2010

Pathological gamblers are risking more than their money, they are also three times more likely to commit suicide than non-betters.


Perceptual Training Improves Vision of the Elderly, Research Finds
November 27th, 2010

Elderly adults can improve their vision with perceptual training, according to a study from the University of California, Riverside and Boston University that has implications for the health and mobility of senior citizens.


Depression May Be Both Consequence of and Risk Factor for Diabetes
November 27th, 2010

Diabetes appears to be associated with the risk of depression and vice versa, suggesting the relationship between the two works in both directions, according to a report in the November 22 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.


Sensory Detection and Discrimination: Neural Basis of Rapid Brain Adaptation Revealed
November 27th, 2010

You detect an object flying at your head. What do you do? You probably first move out of the way — and then you try to determine what the object is. Your brain is able to quickly switch from detecting an object moving in your direction to determining what the object is through a phenomenon called adaptation.


For HIV-Positive Patients, Delayed Treatment a Costly Decision
November 27th, 2010

HIV infected patients whose treatment is delayed not only become sicker than those treated earlier, but also require tens of thousands of dollars more in care over the first several years of their treatment.


Late-Preterm Babies at Greater Risk for Problems Later in Childhood, Study Finds
November 27th, 2010

Late-preterm babies — those born between 34 and 36 weeks — are at an increased risk for cognitive and emotional problems, regardless of maternal IQ or demographics.


Gene Linked to ADHD Allows Memory Task to Be Interrupted by Brain Regions Tied to Daydreaming
November 27th, 2010

Neuroscientists at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) say brain scans show that a gene nominally linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) leads to increased interference by brain regions associated with mind wandering during mental tasks.


Experts Question Whether Patients Will Use Performance Data to Choose Their Care
November 27th, 2010

Expectations are high that the public will use performance data to choose their health providers and so drive improvements in quality.


Haiti Cholera Outbreaks: Experts Urge US to Create Emergency Cholera Vaccine Stockpile for Humanitarian Use
November 27th, 2010

In the wake of devastating cholera outbreaks in refugee camps in earthquake-wracked Haiti, a group of leading experts from Harvard Medical School, George Washington University, and the International Vaccine Institute (IVI) has urged the United States to create an emergency stockpile of cholera vaccines for future humanitarian use.


Jet-Lagged and Forgetful? It’s No Coincidence: Memory, Learning Problems Persist Long After Periods of Jet Lag
November 27th, 2010

Chronic jet lag alters the brain in ways that cause memory and learning problems long after one’s return to a regular 24-hour schedule, according to research by University of California, Berkeley, psychologists.


New Imaging Technique Accurately Finds Cancer Cells, Fast
November 27th, 2010

The long, anxious wait for biopsy results could soon be over, thanks to a tissue-imaging technique developed at the University of Illinois.


How People Perceive Sour Flavors: Proton Current Drives Action Potentials in Taste Cells
November 27th, 2010

This Thanksgiving, when the tartness of cranberry sauce smacks your tongue, consider the power of sour.


Breastfeeding While Taking Seizure Drugs May Not Harm Child’s IQ, Study Suggests
November 27th, 2010

There’s good news for women with epilepsy. Breastfeeding your baby while taking your seizure medication may have no harmful effect on your child’s IQ later on.


Combining Aerobic and Resistance Training Appears Helpful for Patients With Diabetes
November 27th, 2010

Performing a combination of aerobic exercise and resistance training was associated with improved glycemic levels among patients with type 2 diabetes, compared to patients who did not exercise.


A Cancer Cell’s Beginning Reconstructed in a Test Tube
November 27th, 2010

What prompts normal cells to transform themselves into cancerous cells? Researchers from Texas institutions, including the UT Health Science Center San Antonio, have identified factors in the very first step of the process and reconstituted this first step in the test tube.


High BMI in Childhood Linked to Greater Heart Disease Risk in Adolescence
November 27th, 2010

Children who have a high body mass index (BMI) between 9 and 12 years of age are more likely to have high blood pressure, cholesterol and blood insulin levels (all risk factors for developing heart disease) by the time they reach adolescence, according to a study published online in the British Medical Journal.


Iron Compounds Synthesized to Combat Tuberculosis
November 27th, 2010

A team of researchers from Spain and Latin America have synthesized two iron compounds that inhibit the in vitro growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that causes tuberculosis.


No Link Between Mold Growth and Development of Asthma and Allergy, Scandinavian Study Finds
November 27th, 2010

A recent Scandinavian study shows that there is no link between mold-spore concentrations in the indoor air and development of asthma and allergy among children.


US Death Rate from Congenital Heart Defects Continues to Decline
November 27th, 2010

The U.S. death rate from congenital heart defects dropped 24 percent from 1999 to 2006 among children and adults.


New Insight Into the Cause of Common Dementia
November 27th, 2010

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic campus in Florida have found a clue as to how some people develop a form of dementia that affects the brain areas associated with personality, behavior, and language.


Cholesterol Drug Shows Benefits for Kidney Patients, Study Suggests
November 27th, 2010

A combination drug that lowers levels of ‘bad’ cholesterol in the blood can benefit people with chronic kidney disease and is safe.


Severe Asthma More Prevalent Than Thought, Related to Pronounced Nasal Symptoms
November 27th, 2010

People with multi-symptom asthma more often have night-time awakenings due to asthma-symptoms, a sign of severe asthma.


Have We Found the Universe that Existed Before the Big Bang?
November 24th, 2010

The current cosmological consensus is that the universe began 13.7 billion years ago with the Big Bang. But a legendary physicist says he’s found the first evidence of an eternal, cyclic cosmos.


How the Universe Evolved from a Liquid
November 24th, 2010

The universe was a super-hot liquid in the moments immediately after its birth, according to the first results from an experiment to recreate the conditions of Big Bang.


Quantum Time Travel: Black Hole Not Required
November 23rd, 2010

You don’t need to set the universe in a spin to see time travel in action – so what happened when a photon with a quantum gun went back to kill itself?


Apparition Photos: Non-Linear/Non-Local Effects?
November 22nd, 2010

An excellent and in-depth article about apparitions appearing in photos.


Did Dead Alien Microbes Spawn Life on Earth?
November 22nd, 2010

There are numerous theories on how life spawned on Earth and now a new research has indicated that life came from an interstellar origin;


Kidney Procedure Reduces High Blood Pressure, Study Finds
November 19th, 2010

A simple surgical procedure that destroys certain nerves in the organ can help patients whose condition hasn’t responded to conventional medications.


Antihydrogen Trapped at Long Last
November 19th, 2010

Atoms made of antimatter have been trapped for the first time, a feat that will allow us to test whether antimatter responds to the fundamental forces in the same way as regular matter.


Feeling The Future: Is Precognition Possible?
November 18th, 2010

Rational people and serious scientists dismiss the possibility of psi and assume that parapsychology is fake because these have consistently failed the test of replication. Until this one by Daryl Bems.


Is this Proof that Spooky Auras are Real?
November 18th, 2010

A study on a new form of emotion-colour synaesthesia which projects itself as coloured auras, suggests that glowing visions of light that emanate from a person’s body, really are true.


Life on Mars Could Stem From Earth
November 16th, 2010

As Scientists develop a detector to identify and classify DNA and RNA found on Mars, they suspect any Martian life, if it exists, is related to Earth life.


Time to Envision a New Reality?
November 10th, 2010

For 11 days, starting on 11/11/10, many people around the world will envision a future of solutions instead of problems. Given that thought has real power on a quantum level and our reality is determined by our thoughts and actions focusing on what we want instead of what we don’t want can only help.


Bacteria Can Lead to Evolution of New Species
November 10th, 2010

A report suggests that bacteria can indirectly change the species of its host fly, which in turn could lead to the evolution of new fly species.


Scientists Convert Skin To Blood
November 9th, 2010

Researchers at Canada’s McMaster University report that they’ve figured out how to make blood out of human skin.


Faulty Energy Factories in the Brain Causes Parkinson’s?
November 6th, 2010

Parkinson’s disease may stem from an energy crisis in the brain, years before symptoms appear. If the research pans out, it points to a possible new approach for Parkinson’s.


Parents Can Now Donate Cord Blood After Birth
November 6th, 2010

For the first time, South Florida parents can follow up the joy of childbirth by donating the life-saving blood from their baby’s umbilical cord.


The Cell Phone Trap
November 5th, 2010

Use a cell phone – commit slow suicide. Cell phones are the solution to human overpopulation.


Genes Marked by Stress Make Grandchildren Mentally Ill
November 5th, 2010

A little thing called methylation means that parental neglect, or eating a poor diet, could lead to depression or schizophrenia two generations later.


MRI Brain Imaging Pinpoints Deception
November 4th, 2010

Our ability to project a picture of ourselves in other people’s minds may be down to a distinct form of brain activity, according to a report.


Scientists Find ‘Liberal Gene’
November 2nd, 2010

Researchers have determined that genetics could matter when it comes to some adults’ political leanings.